Monday, 13 December 2010

ClassNK Give Clarification on BNWAS Installation

Japanese classification society ClassNK has released technical information to help clarify the criteria vessels under its class should meet with regards to the installation of bridge navigational watch alarm systems (BNWAS).

The requirements for a BNWAS were laid down in amendments to SOLAS Chapter V Regulation 19 and the performance criteria for these BNWAS were outlined in MSC.128(75) – Performance Standards for a Bridge Navigational Watch Alarm System (BNWAS). Most of things covered in NKK’s guidelines are the same as in the MSC.128(75) performance standards, however, NKK have given extra detail on a couple of areas to make the requirements more explicit.

The first area of clarification is given in section (1) (ii). Whereas MSC.128(75) only says that the reset function should be easily accessible from the bridge wings, the NKK guidelines explicitly state that one reset device should be provided on each bridge wing unless it is easy to reset a first stage alarm using a nearby reset device in the wheelhouse.

The other area where NKK go into more details is in section (2)(ii). MSC.128(75) only describes the location for 2nd and 3rd stage alarms as ‘locations of the Master, officers and further crew members capable of taking corrective action’. NKK give much clearer guidance by saying the 2nd stage alarms should be located in the Captain’s bedroom and Deck officer’s cabin while the 3rd stage alarm should be located in the Officer’s Mess room, Saloon, Recreation room and Ship’s office.

Even if your vessels are not classified with NKK, you may still find these guidelines useful in providing insight to how one classification society views an area of the performance standards that it feels needs extra clarification.

The full text of the guidelines is as follows:

Guidelines for BNWAS Installation

(1) Reset devices:
(i) At least one reset device should be provided near each conning position in the wheelhouse.
More reset devices may be provided to the workstations for navigation, manoeuvring and monitoring in order for safe and effective operation, if desired.
A reset function may be initiated by motion sensors and navigational equipment such as radar, auto-pilot, ECDIS, INS, etc.
(ii) One reset device should be provided to each bridge wing.
Where it is easy to reset a first stage alarm by a reset device located nearby in the wheelhouse, reset devices are not required to be fitted at bridge wings.

(2) Visual indicators and First stage audible alarms
(i) A visual indicator and first stage audible alarm are to be provided in the wheelhouse.
When they are combined with a reset device, individual visual indicators and first stage alarms are not required.
(ii) A visual indicator and first stage audible alarm are to be provided in the bridge wings.
Where a reset device is not provided in the case of 1(ii) above, the following functions are required:
- Flashing indicator in the wheelhouse should be visible from an operational position on the bridge wing; and
- First audible alarm in the wheelhouse should be audible from an operational position on the bridge wing.

(3) Second stage audible alarms and Third stage audible alarms
(i) Second stage audible alarms should be located in the Captain's bedroom and Deck officer's cabins.
In cases where there are three deck officers on board, one deck officer for duty may be selected from the main panel and the alarm in the Captain's bedroom may be changed to a third stage one.
(ii) Third stage alarms should be located in the Officer's Mess room, Saloon, Recreation room and Ship's office.

(4) BNWAS should be supplied by both an AC source (Main and Emergency source) and a DC source (ship's batteries or batteries contained within the device).

(5) BNWAS for ships constructed on or after 1 July 2011 are to be connected with the following mandatory equipment required by SOLAS.
(i) Heading Control System and Track Control System
(ii) Voyage Data Recorder (VDR)

(6) With respect to small ships, BNWAS installations may be designed according to relaxed requirements in cases where such requirements are specified by the Flag State.

(7) An emergency call facility may be provided.

Navgard™ - Martek Marine’s Type Approved BNWAS

Navgard™ is Martek Marine’s answer to compliance with the BNWAS requirements. It is Type Approved with a number of the major classification societies as well as meeting with MSC.128(75) and IEC 62616:2010 performance standards.

Navgard™ BNWAS – Click to find out more.


Tuesday, 16 November 2010

Paul Luen Talks to BBC Radio About Trade with China

Martek Marine's CEO Paul Luen has been speaking to BBC Radio Sheffield about how China has always been viewed as an important market for the company and how Martek is currently thriving thanks to it's links and exports to the country.

video

Thursday, 23 September 2010

What is BNWAS?

A BNWAS is required under the amended
terms of SOLAS Chapter V Regulation 19
The term BNWAS is an acronym for the term Bridge Navigational Watch Alarm System – a safety system made mandatory in amendments to SOLAS Chapter V Regulation 19 and adopted on 5th June 2009 by Resolution MSC.282(86).

As outlined in the performance standards MSC.128(75) - “The purpose of the bridge navigational watch alarm system (BNWAS) is to monitor bridge activity and detect operator disability which could lead to marine accidents. The system monitors the awareness of the Officer of the Watch (OOW) and automatically alerts the Master or another qualified OOW if for any reason the OOW becomes incapable of performing the OOW’s duties. This purpose is achieved by a series of indications and alarms to alert first the OOW and, if he is not responding, then to alert the Master or another qualified OOW. Additionally, the BNWAS may provide the OOW with a means of calling for immediate assistance if required. The BNWAS should be operational whenever the ship’s heading or track control system is engaged, unless inhibited by the Master.”

When Is Your Deadline for Compliance

The amendments to SOLAS Chapter V Regulation 19 state that a bridge navigational watch alarm system (BNWAS) should be installed as follows:
  • cargo ships of 150 gross tonnage and upwards and passenger ships irrespective of size constructed on or after 1 July 2011;
  • passenger ships irrespective of size constructed before 1 July 2011, not later than the first survey* after 1 July 2012;
  • cargo ships of 3,000 gross tonnage and upwards constructed before 1 July 2011, not later than the first survey* after 1 July 2012;
  • cargo ships of 500 gross tonnage and upwards but less than 3,000 gross tonnage constructed before 1 July 2011, not later than the first survey* after 1 July 2013; and
  • cargo ships of 150 gross tonnage and upwards but less than 500 gross tonnage constructed before 1 July 2011, not later than the first survey* after 1 July 2014.
A bridge navigational watch alarm system (BNWAS) installed prior to 1 July 2011 may subsequently be exempted from full compliance with the standards adopted by the Organization, at the discretion of the Administration.

When Should You Install?

BIMCO has advised its members to fit systems at their vessels’ next dry docking ahead of the mandatory implementation dates and not wait for annual surveys within the compliance window.

How Can Martek Help You Comply?

Navgard - BNWAS
The Navgard™ bridge navigational watch alarm system (BNWAS) from Martek Marine has been designed specifically to comply with the requirements of the newly amended SOLAS Chapter V Regulation 19.
  • Type Approved by all major classification societies
  • Control panel mounted PIR
  • Simplest system to install
  • On-board data logging and approved VDR output
To find out more about the Navgard™ bridge navigational watch alarm system (BNWAS) click here to visit our website.



Amendments to SOLAS Chapter V Regulation 19 – Requirement for BNWAS

On 5th June 2009 Resolution MSC.282(86) saw the adoption of amendments to the International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea 1974 (SOLAS). Among the changes was an amendment to Chapter V Regulation 19 – Carriage requirements for shipborne navigation systems and equipment. Part of these changes was the requirement for cargo and passenger vessels to install a bridge navigational watch alarm system (BNWAS).

Amended SOLAS regulations call for
BNWAS on cargo and passenger vessels
Addition to SOLAS Regulations

The changes see the following subparagraph is added to paragraph 2.2:

“.3 a bridge navigational watch alarm system (BNWAS), as follows:

.1 cargo ships of 150 gross tonnage and upwards and passenger ships irrespective of size constructed on or after 1 July 2011;

.2 passenger ships irrespective of size constructed before 1 July 2011, not later than the first survey* after 1 July 2012;

.3 cargo ships of 3,000 gross tonnage and upwards constructed before 1 July 2011, not later than the first survey* after 1 July 2012;

.4 cargo ships of 500 gross tonnage and upwards but less than 3,000 gross tonnage constructed before 1 July 2011, not later than the first survey* after 1 July 2013; and

.5 cargo ships of 150 gross tonnage and upwards but less than 500 gross tonnage constructed before 1 July 2011, not later than the first survey* after 1 July 2014.

The bridge navigational watch alarm system shall be in operation whenever the ship is underway at sea;

.4 a bridge navigational watch alarm system (BNWAS) installed prior to 1 July 2011 may subsequently be exempted from full compliance with the standards adopted by the Organization, at the discretion of the Administration.”

Martek’s Solution to the Amended Regulations – Navgard™ BNWAS
 
Navgard™
Bridge Navigational Watch Alarm System
Martek Marine has launched the Navgard™ bridge navigational watch alarm system (BNWAS) in response to the new requirements under the amended SOLAS regulations. The system has been designed specifically to comply with these newly amended regulations.
  • Type Approved by all major classification societies
  • Control panel mounted PIR
  • Simplest system to install
  • On-board data logging and approved VDR output
To find out more about the Navgard™ bridge navigational watch alarm system (BNWAS) click here to visit our website.



Wednesday, 22 September 2010

Vigilant - Martek's New Smoke Monitoring System - Is Discussed in Motorship


Vigilant - Funnel Smoke Monitoring System
Martek Marine has recently launched Vigilant- a ship's funnel smoke monitoring system that measures the density of the smoke being emitted by a vessel to prove compliance with new stringent regional rules against ships exhausting black smoke within sight of shore.

The system uses a transmitter and a receiver on either side of the ship's funnel to measure the density of the smoke and grade the results in terms of the Ringelmann Scale.

Click here to read the Motorship article - Smoke monitoring can save heavy fines

Click here to find out more about Vigilant

Tuesday, 10 August 2010

Martek's Recent MariNOx Order From DSME Receives Some Press in Motorship

Martek Marine's recent order from DSME shipyard in Korea has received some press in Motorship.

The order for the MariNOx engine emissions monitoring system was for 4 new 45,200 dwt heavy lift ro-ro container ships being built for Genoa based shipowner Ignazio Messina.

Click here to read the Motorship article

Click here to read the news story on the Martek Marine website

Monday, 9 August 2010

Give Your Opinion on Marine Industry Topics on Our New Website Poll

A new online poll is one of the new features Martek Marine have launched this week to allow visitors to our website more opportunity to interact with the company, give their views on marine industry topics and to make it easier to keep up-to-date with our latest news via a range of social networks that we now employ.


On the home page we’ve added a poll section where we will be asking for your opinion on a number of marine related topics. We’ll be changing the topic on a regular basis so watch out for new topics appearing and feel free to give your opinion. You can cast your vote and view the results of the current poll.

We have also added links at the bottom of the home page that allow you to follow us on facebook, twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube and Blogger. We are increasingly using these new social mediums to keep you informed of product and industry updates so if you would like to keep up-to-date with all the latest news and industry updates from Martek then click on the icon and follow us.

Visit the Martek Marine website

Friday, 25 June 2010

Training Not Essential to Save a Life With a Defibrillator


There’s a growing debate in the marine industry about the importance of on-board automated external defibrillators (AEDs) with the seafarer’s union Nautilus International calling for the carriage of defibrillators on-board all ships as the only treatment of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA).

While the majority of companies can see that a defibrillator is the only way of giving their crew members a chance of surviving SCA while at sea, you may be one of the companies who still remain concerned about the cost and logistics involved in training all your crew members to use the device in addition to the cost of actually purchasing the units.

Although training is desirable it is by no means a necessity as outlined in the “statement on the training required to use an automated external defibrillator” released by the Resuscitation Council (UK) – the UK body responsible for setting central standards for cardiopulmonary resuscitation – and backed by the British Heart Foundation:

“Automated external defibrillators (AEDs) are designed to be used by members of the public, and are very effective at guiding the operator through the process of administering the shock. They have become widely available, are safe and easy to use, and will not allow a shock to be given to a victim who does not require one.

AEDs have been used frequently by laypeople with modest training, and many reports testify to the success of this strategy. Operators without formal training have also used AEDs successfully to save lives.

While it is highly desirable that those who may be called upon to use an AED should be trained in their use, and keep their skills up to date, circumstances can dictate at no trained operator (or a trained operator whose certificate of training has expired) is present at the site of an emergency. Under these circumstances no inhibitions should be placed on any person willing to use an AED.

It is the view of the Resuscitation Council (UK) that the use of AEDs should NOT be restricted to trained personnel...”

Click here to read the full Resuscitation Council statement.

As the above statement from the Resuscitation Council (UK) clearly shows, even though training is desirable it is not essential in order for your crew to use the defibrillator effectively. Modern defibrillators are designed to be used by non-medically trained personnel and are simple to operate.

Training can always be carried out at a later date when budgets allow. By having a defibrillator on-board at least you can have the means available to treat a sudden cardiac arrest victim. A defibrillator in an untrained hand is still an effective lifesaver while not having a defibrillator on-board your ships means your crews’ chances of surviving SCA at sea are zero.

Find out more about the Lifeforce® Marine Defibrillator

We are always interested in finding out what our industry colleagues think about this subject so please feel free to leave a comment.

Visit our website: www.martek-marine.com